Joseph J. Colarusso, Attorney at Law Joseph J. Colarusso, Attorney at Law
Free Consultation 203-977-2415 Stamford, CT 866-734-6937 Toll Free 914-946-2777 White Plains, NY
Free Consultation
Stamford, CT 203-977-2415
White Plains, NY 914-946-2777
Main Navigation

What is the one-leg stand field sobriety test?

In a previous post, the walk-and-turn field sobriety test was reviewed. However, that is not the only test you may be asked to take if a law enforcement officer in Connecticut suspects you may be impaired by alcohol while driving. FieldSobrietyTests.org explains that a second test also evaluates your ability to balance, follow instructions and execute multiple tasks simultaneously. This is called the one-leg stand test.

As the name implies, this test requires you to balance on one leg. The other leg must be lifted so that your foot remains parallel to the ground, roughly six inches off the ground. If you are wearing a shoe with a heel, you may have the option to take your shoes off although that may not be your preference if it is very cold, rainy, icy or snowy out. Even if dry, some road surfaces may not be comfortable to stand let alone balance on without shoes.

While holding one foot up, you are required to keep your eyes fixed on that raised foot. Then, you must count so the officer can hear you in the exact manner he or she has done when demonstrating the test for you. You must count until you are instructed to stop. Your arms are not allowed to leave your sides during the test. Overall, this test is accurate in determining potential intoxication 65 percent of the time.

This information is not intended to provide legal advice but is instead meant to give Connecticut residents an overview of the one-leg stand field sobriety test.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
Under Arrest? Call our 24-hour emergency line 203-325-2200

Contact Us For Legal Help

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network