Joseph J. Colarusso, Attorney at Law
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Criminal Defense Archives

The First Step Act is truly just a first step

People who live in New York and find themselves charged with a criminal offense might feel trapped and as if they have no options. For many people, there can exist a tragic cycle that keeps them in jail or prison or prevents them from putting their lives on a better path. 

Why do people falsely confess to committing crimes?

It seems hard to imagine why someone would admit to committing a crime even though the person is innocent, and yet as the Innocence Project points out, one out of every four people who have been exonerated of criminal convictions due to DNA evidence had made false confessions of guilt in the first place. People in Connecticut should be aware of why people falsely confess and how to prevent making such admissions in the first place.

Do repeat offenders face higher sentences?

If you were facing a second or third time in the Connecticut justice system, it would be perfectly natural to be nervous about how your previous offenses and convictions might affect your current proceedings. The fact is that, if you received a conviction for a new crime, there could be a chance for enhanced penalties based on your previous record.

Innocent man placed behind bars

In 1989, a Connecticut man received a 50-year prison sentence after being convicted of first-degree sexual assault, felony murder and third-degree burglary. He spent nearly 20 years in prison before DNA evidence showed he was innocent of the crime. According to the Innocence Project, unvalidated forensic science methods were used and the erroneous findings were admitted to the court as evidence in the case. Furthermore, unreliable informants made false statements saying the innocent man had admitted to the crime, prompting law enforcement officials to arrest the man and bring charges against him.

Dealing with false accusations of abuse

Sometimes, people go too far. Even if your marriage were to experience problems — differences of opinion about living arrangements, financial trouble or child-rearing disagreements, for example — there would be no excuse for your partner to use false accusations of domestic abuse to settle the argument. At the offices of Joseph J. Colarusso, Attorney at Law, we are proud to defend our Connecticut clients — and the reputation of the legal system, by extension — by working to reveal the truth behind these types of spurious claims. 

How we aim to stop trials before they start

When a client walks into our Connecticut offices, the team supporting Joseph J. Colarusso, Attorney at Law, is focused on one thing — getting his or case resolved in the most advantageous and expedient manner available. That often means that we must start quickly, gathering information and taking full advantage of the state's robust pre-trial negotiation phase.

Clearing your Connecticut criminal record

A Connecticut criminal record has the potential to haunt you, potentially affecting everything from where you can work to whether you can secure a loan or rent an apartment. Depending on the circumstances of your case and whether you already have a criminal record, among other contingencies, you may be able to pursue something called a criminal record erasure, which essentially shields your criminal record from public viewing. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Colarusso, we understand how much a criminal record can negatively impact your life, and we have helped many people facing similar circumstances find solutions that meet their needs.

What to say or not say if you are arrested

Almost everyone knows about the constitutional right to remain silent when arrested, so many Connecticut residents will decide not to stay anything to the police until they have contacted legal counsel. However, some people may not exercise this right, or they might become flustered when a police officer pulls them over. It is crucial to keep in mind what to say and what not to say to a police officer to avoid potential problems.

How “plain view” can lead to a vehicle search

Being stopped and searched on a Connecticut road is something many motorists would prefer to avoid. As Findlaw points out, police officers are barred from vehicle searches unless those searches meet specific legal requirements. However, while some search requirements, such as a search warrant, are well known, many motorists may not be aware that something in their vehicle may be giving a police officer a different rationale for a search.

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