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Criminal Defense Archives

Can a lawyer accept a plea deal on your behalf?

According to the American Bar Association (ABA), legal commentators say that 95 percent of judicial cases are settled even before they go to trial. Many people in Connecticut will actually settle their cases through a plea agreement worked out with the assistance of their attorney. However, it is vital for anyone who is going through a court proceeding to understand that acceping a plea deal or a settlement is a choice for them to make alone. 

When can I refuse to answer police questions?

The idea of being questioned by police naturally makes many people in Connecticut nervous. No one wants to slip up and say the wrong thing that can be used against that person in a courtroom. Because of this possibility, it is important to know under what circumstances police may speak to you, and when you can refuse to answer their questions.

Supreme Court rules on pretrial conferences

People who are accused of criminal offenses in Connecticut may sometimes have the opportunity to engage in plea bargains with the prosecuction team. These discussions may offer benefits to both prosecutors and defendants. For the former group, an agreement may result in faster processing of a case which reduces the load on the court system. For defendants, a plea deal may often result in a lesser charge being entered which may in turn lead to a lighter set of penalties compared to that associated with the original request.

What does pleading no contest mean?

When you face criminal charges, the court will ask you for your plea. Most people know you have the option to plead guilty or not guilty, but there are other options in most cases. Technically, this is called pleading nolo contendere, according to This type of plea means you are admitting guilt for the charges and you agree the court may punish you for committing the crime. Even though the plea will end up with the same results as just pleading guilty, it is quite different than a guilty plea. 

What is a mandatory minimum sentence?

People who are arrested and charged with criminal offenses in Connecticut may often have immediate concerns about what type of punishment or consequence they may face. In particular, it is understandable for you or anyone is this position to want to know if you will have to spend time in jail and, if so, how much time you will need to spend. Depending upon the offense that a person is convicted of, there may be what is called a mandatory minimum sentence.

Leftover opioids contribute to misuse of drugs

It is not uncommon for a Connecticut resident to receive a prescription for pain medication from a doctor or a dentist. Whether a major surgery to remove a tumor or a root canal, many procedures leave people in need of pain relief. Other conditions find patients struggling with chronic pain that must be managed. In recent years, a growing reliance on opioid medications originally designed to manage pain has allegedly led to another problem - drug addiction.

Understanding forensic testing for drug and DUI cases

If you have been charged with a drug-related crime or a driving under the influence charge in Connecticut, you may find it helpful to learn about the types of toxicology and forensic tests that are done  in your case. Many law enforcement officers and prosecutors may look to the results of scientific tests in order to support their arrestof you and their further prosecution of you for the alleged offenses.

Task force to oversee use of body and dash cameras

People in Connecticut may be aware that more and more law enforcement agencies around the country have been adopting the use of video cameras by officers. Some of these cameras are mounted on the dashboards of police vehicles while others are literally worn on police uniforms. Recently, the Connecticut House of Representatives has passed H.B. 7308 which seeks to further the implementation of this technology in the state.

Electronic monitoring technology

People in Connecticut who are arrested for or convicted of certain offenses may be required to submit to electronic monitoring by probation officers or parole officers. There are two types of systems used to monitor people as the Connecticut General Assembly explains.

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