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Violent Crimes Archives

The ways in which manslaughter differs from murder

As most Connecticut residents understand, a murder charge can arise from the killing of another person. However, this area of law can be complex, especially if the one accused of the crime insists that he or she did not mean to cause the death of the other person.

Scientific evidence may lead to false convictions

In many criminal cases, forensic science is used to either prove or disprove information involving the crime. According to the Innocence Project, more than 350 cases have been overturned by the court because DNA evidence proved that the person was innocent of committing a crime. Of those 350, nearly 45 percent involved misapplication of forensic science.

Understanding Connecticut arraignments

Those accused of a crime are often initially confused about the Connecticut criminal judicial process. This confusion could lead to fear, especially if one were anxious about the long-term consequences of a trial. However, it is usually advisable to act from a considered position, informed by a study of the multiple stages of criminal proceedings.

Are eyewitness lineups accurate and reliable?

If you have been charged with a crime in Connecticut, you may be forced to participate in an eyewitness lineup. While many states in the nation implement these procedures, multiple studies show that this method of identifying a suspect can be inaccurate and often yields unreliable results. According to the Innocence Project, more than 70 percent of documented wrongful convictions in the U.S. involved eyewitness misidentification, making it one of the leading causes of conviction errors. The problem not only lies in faulty lineup procedures implemented by law enforcement departments, but also in flaws involving the human memory and the way the brain functions under stress.

Do repeat offenders face automatic jail time in Connecticut?

Connecticut state law provides for an increase in sentencing severity to dissuade recidivism. Persistent offenders, to use the language of the penal code, might face jail more often than individuals convicted of their first offense. For example, if you had a criminal record that included significant jail time or a death sentence, or if you had been previously convicted of certain crimes, you would conceivably be at risk for a more stringent penalty in a pending case.

Maintaining impartiality during rape trial processes

If you know much about what happens during formal Connecticut rape accusations, then you are aware that emotions and persuasion have the potential to take the place of good legal logic, forensic science and diligent police work. During our practice at the law offices of Joseph J. Colarusso, Attorney At Law we have found that there are many ways in which an otherwise simple innocent act could twist and turn around in the minds of a jury.

Does social media affect your right to a fair trial?

Arrests or charges filed in a case involving a violent crime are immediate content for social media. News organizations are quick to splash details all over their social media accounts and encourage followers to make comments and discuss the case. If you are charged with a violent crime, you may wonder how this will affect your right to a fair trial. Afterall, if the potential jury pool is reading about your case and hearing all these opinions on it, can they really be impartial?

Understanding Connecticut's statutory rape laws

Many people in Connecticut might generally have an understanding that statutory rape refers to sexual contact with a minor, they may not fully understand the state's laws on this matter. This is because the laws can be quite complex and there is not just one definition of what might constitute statutory rape. Learning about this is importnat for anyone who might have a relationship with someone under the age of 18.

What are the issues with no body for a murder charge?

If someone is facing a murder charge, typically, it is because a body has been found, along with evidence linking them to the crime. However, in Connecticut, you could be charged with murder even if there is no body. According to the New Haven Register, as long as there is evidence you committed the crime, you could face murder charges. 

Defendant rejects plea deal

Connecticut residents who are arrested and charged with criminal offenses may have multiple ways to approach their defense. One approach to a criminal defense is to enter into a plea agreement with the prosecution. A plea agreement often includes a defendant pleading guilty to a charge that is lesser than what they may face in a trial in exchange for not having to go through the full trial process. 

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