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Connecticut considering “opioid courts” to address epidemic

As a resident of Connecticut who is grappling with an addiction to opioids, first, recognize that you are not alone in your struggles. Opioid addiction has become an increasingly pervasive problem across the state and nation, killing hundreds of Connecticut residents each year, and the issue has become so widespread that a task force now exists to determine how the state can best combat the problem. Attorney Joseph J. Colarusso recognizes that criminal behavior often stems from drug addiction, and we have helped many criminal offenders with drug addictions pursue solutions that meet their needs.

According to the Hartford Courant, the opioid epidemic has become so pronounced within state lines that some of Connecticut’s strongest legal minds and judicial officials have come together to try to fight it. While the task force will likely consider any number of different efforts aimed at reducing opioid abuse in the state, one particular effort they are exploring is creating drug court programs aimed directly at opioid addicts.

Drug courts, which typically hold addicts accountable for their crimes while helping them get better at the same time, have proven, positive effects on addiction, and task force members are working to determine whether opioid-specific courts may prove even more beneficial for addicts. In addition to possibly establishing opioid-specific drug courts, task force members are exploring other efforts that might include drug testing arrestees and requiring that they undergo daily monitoring by a Connecticut court.

In 2017, the state referred about 19,000 drug offenders to various treatment programs, and some of those programs offered medication-assisted treatment in an effort to better address opioid addiction. You can find out more about the connection between drug addiction and criminal activity on our webpage.

FindLaw Network